Long-running INSERT

On one of the databases I’m looking after (11.2.0.4, Solaris, non-RAC), several different INSERT statements (all into tablespaces with manually managed segments) suffer from occasional hiccups. The symptoms are always the same: in one of the sessions, the INSERT gets stuck doing lots of single-block I/O against one of the indexes on the inserted table, and if other sessions are running similar INSERTs, they hang on enq: TX – index contention. The situation can last just a few seconds, but sometimes it’s much longer than this (several minutes), in which case the impact on the application is quite serious.

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Method R and parallelism (another real-life example)

In my previous post I mentioned method R as probably the most efficient approach to SQL optimization. However, it is important to focus on correct metrics for it to work correctly.
Consider this example (once again, the query is still running, so the only reliable diagnostic tool at our disposal is SQL real-time monitor):

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DB time vs duration

Performance tuning is all about time. You measure the time it takes for a certain process to complete, and then you search for ways to reduce this time to improve end-users experience and/or increase the application productivity. But minimizing time is not enough — it’s important to minimize the correct time metric. A typical mistake in database performance optimization to optimize DB time instead of the duration experienced by the end user. If this happens, this can easily result in a situation when DB time is reduced significantly, but the process is still taking almost as long as before, the SLA is still breached, bosses and users are increasingly frustrated.

In this post, I will give two real-life examples of cases when the difference between DB time and elapsed time was the key to understanding the problem.

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Read consistency overhead

SQL performance can degrade for many reasons, some of most common are:
– plan changes
– data skewness
– low caching efficiency
– data growth
– contention.

All these factors are relatively well known. A somewhat less common, although not exceptionally rare scenario, is read consistency overhead due to concurrent DML against queried tables. Because of being less common, this scenario is often overlooked, which leads to false diagnoses (and eventually to “fixes” that can do more harm than good).

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Global Hints

Occasionally I encounter a situation when I need to affect a part of the plan that corresponds to a view, e.g.:

select *
from
(
   select v.x, x.y
   from v
) q
where q.x = 1

Such situations are resolved using global hints. Oracle offers two ways to specify a global hint: via a query block identifier (system generated or user defined) or via view aliases. System-generated query block identifiers can be obtained via dbms_xplan.display with ALL or ALIAS option (they have the form SEL$n, where n appears to be same as the depth, e.g. in our case 1 corresponds to the main query, 2 to the inline view, 3 to the view V inside that inline view) or defined by the user via qb_name hint.

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Tuning Analytic Functions

In general, tuning analytic functions (and more generally, all sort operations) is rather difficult. While for most poorly performing queries it’s relatively straightforward to gain some improvements ┬áby applying “eliminate early” principle one way or another, for slow sort operations it’s rarely applicable. Usually options are limiting to rewriting a query without analytics (e.g. using self-joins or correlated subqueries to achieve the same goal) or manually resizing the workarea to reduce/eliminate the use of disk.┬áRecently, however, I had a case where I managed to obtain an excellent performance gain using a different technique that I would like to share in this post.

The original query was selecting about 100 columns using the LAG function on one of the columns in the WHERE clause, but in my test case I’ll both simplify and generalize the situation. Let’s create a table with a sequential id, three filtering columns x, y and z, and 20 sufficiently lengthy columns.

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CPU starvation disguised as an I/O issue (yet another AWR case study)

In AWR analysis, what appears to be the root cause of the issue, can easily turn out to be just a symptom. Last week, Rajat sent me an AWR report which is a perfect illustration of this (thanks Rajat), I posted the key sections from this report below (sorry for less than perfect formatting — I had to manually re-format the HTML version of the report into text).


WORKLOAD REPOSITORY report for
DB Name      DB Id           Instance       Inst num        Release          RAC           Host
DSS          37220993      dss              1               10.2.0.4.0       NO            dssdbnz

                  Snap Id      Snap Time             Sessions      Cursors/Session
Begin Snap:       18471      12-Oct-12 08:30:28      131              1.5
End Snap:         18477      12-Oct-12 14:30:24      108              1.8
Elapsed:          359.93 (mins)
DB Time:          25,730.14 (mins)

Load Profile
                              Per Second      Per Transaction
Redo size:                    325,282.85      103,923.02
Logical reads:                33,390.52       10,667.77
Block changes:                1,307.95        417.87
Physical reads:               1,927.33        615.75
Physical writes:              244.65          78.16
User calls:                   391.34          125.03
Parses:                       68.14           21.77
Hard parses:                  3.33            1.06
Sorts:                        47.86           15.29
Logons:                       3.15            1.01
Executes:                     234.32          74.86
Transactions:                 3.13
% Blocks changed per Read:       3.92       Recursive Call %:      61.11
Rollback per transaction %:      24.71      Rows per Sort:         3325.52

Top 5 Timed Events
Event                               Waits          Time(s)      Avg Wait(ms)      % Total Call Time      Wait Class
free buffer waits              10,726,838      344,377     32      22.3      Configuration
db file sequential read        6,122,262      335,366      55      21.7      User I/O
db file scattered read         3,597,607      305,576      85      19.8      User I/O
CPU time                                      161,491              10.5
read by other session          2,572,875      156,821     61       10.2      User I/O

Operating System Statistics
Statistic                                 Total
AVG_BUSY_TIME                             2,093,109
AVG_IDLE_TIME                             63,212
AVG_IOWAIT_TIME                           18,463
AVG_SYS_TIME                              87,749
AVG_USER_TIME                             2,004,722
BUSY_TIME                                 16,749,988
IDLE_TIME                                 510,692
IOWAIT_TIME                               152,594
SYS_TIME                                  707,137
USER_TIME                                 16,042,851
LOAD                                      4
OS_CPU_WAIT_TIME                          ###############
RSRC_MGR_CPU_WAIT_TIME                    0
VM_IN_BYTES                               5,503,492,096
VM_OUT_BYTES                              2,054,414,336
PHYSICAL_MEMORY_BYTES                     34,288,209,920
NUM_CPUS                                  8
NUM_CPU_SOCKETS                           8

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