Nested loop internals

Nested loop join appears like the simplest thing there could be — you go through one table, and as you go, per each row found you probe the second table to see if you find any matching rows. But thanks to a number of optimizations introduced in recent Oracle releases, it has become much more complex than that. Randolf Geist has written a great series of posts about this join mechanism (part 1, part 2 and part 3) where he explores in a great detail how numerous nested loop optimization interact with various logical I/O optimizations for unique and non-unique indexes. Unfortunately, it doesn’t cover the physical I/O aspects, and that seems to me like the most interesting part — after all, that was the primary motivation behind introducing all those additional nested loop join mechanism on the top of the basic classical nested loop. So I conducted a study on my own, and I’m presenting my results in the mini-series that I’m opening with this post.

Continue reading “Nested loop internals”

Peeking table block contents

Sometimes you want to know what’s inside a certain block. Of course, the most straightforward way to do it is by dumping block contents using ALTER SYSTEM DUMP DATAFILE contents and analyzing it. However, “straightforward” doesn’t mean “simple”. Block dumps represent its contents in binary format which is hard to read. Sure, there are various utilities (like utl_raw) that can help you convert everything to the human-readable format, but it’s going to be a tedious and time-consuming job, especially if you need more than just a few values from just a couple of blocks. Another problem is that you may not have access to the server OS shell (e.g. developers rarely have access to it even on non-production system, except maybe on private sandboxes).

There’s a better way, at least if the block you’re interested in is a standard table data block and all you want to know is what kind of data it contains (and not internal information like locks, flags, free space etc.). The idea is that rather than going to the block itself, you can use rowid to calculate the block address and the relative file number. If you know the table of interest, and if you do the calculation above for all its rows, then you simply filter out the particular block you’re interested in from the resultset. It’s really much simpler than it sounds, just bear with me a little and you’ll see.

The first step would be identifying the segment name. Normally you already know it from the very beginning. For example, if you found the address of the block that you want to look up in ASH or in a trace file, e.g. as p1 and p2 parameters of “db file sequential read” event, then you can simply take current_obj# and look up the object name in DBA_OBJECTS, using object_id (and/or data_object_id) as the key.

Once you have the table name, you can display block contents using rowid_relative_fno and rowid_block_number functions of dbms_rowid package:

select *
from
(
select id1,
id2,
dbms_rowid.rowid_relative_fno(rowid) fno,
dbms_rowid.rowid_block_number(rowid) block#
from &mytable
)
where fno = :fno
and block# = :blockno;

where &mytable obviously should be replaced with the name of the table identified in the previous step.

It could be convenient to aggregate the query above so that each block’s contents would be represented by a single row. For example, imagine that you have a table with a composite primary key (id1, id2), so that knowing these two values is enough to identify the row. Then you can use listagg to compactly represent block contents:


select listagg('(' || id1 || ',' || id2 || ')') within group (order by id1, id2) block_contents, fno, block#
from
(
select id1,
id2,
dbms_rowid.rowid_relative_fno(rowid) fno,
dbms_rowid.rowid_block_number(rowid) block#
from &mytable
)
group by fno, block#

This is particularly convenient when working with a relatively large number of blocks that can be extracted from another SQL statement, e.g. a query on an external table built on top of a trace or a dump file as described in one of my recent posts (e.g. here).

As a final touch, you can also add a query block to identify the table’s segment header to make sure you don’t miss it:

 


select 'segment header' block_contents,
header_file fno,
header_block block#
from dba_segments
where segment_name = '&mytable'

You can’t do the same trick on indexes as there’s no rowid for an index entry, but there are other ways to peek at contents of branch and leaf index blocks. If I get a chance, I’ll show one or two such methods in a separate blog post.

 

My 2015

Year 2015 was a very good one for me, even though not exactly in a way I expected it to be. I didn’t get to blog as much as I wanted to, and I didn’t get as many interesting performance troubleshooting to do as years before that. But there was lots of other interesting experiences — e.g. designing, running and analyzing all sorts of sophisticated performance tests for a candidate hardware platform.

Of course, the most important event of the year was moving to the UK, and the new challenges and opportunities this move presented. It was a very positive experience overall (although there are a few aspects of life in the UK that I still need to adapt to, but that’s perfectly normal).

I also spoke at Harmony 2015 conference in Tallinn (LGWR stuff from my previous year’s research), and that was also new and important experience for me. I’m hoping to do this more in the future. I attended a very interesting UKOUG Tech’15 conference in Birmingham (as a delegate, not a speaker), and had a few very interesting conversations there (in particular, I’m very grateful to Tanel Poder for finding some time for me — that conversation was extremely useful).

I am really looking forward to 2016. No one knows what it would bring us, but I have good reasons to expect great things from it. For example, there’s a good chance that I’ll get involved with some interesting topics, including Exadata, building integrated solutions using both relational and non-relational technologies, performance-related internals digging, and others (and of course I’ll cover the most interesting stuff in this blog).

I am hoping that 2016 would be an eventful and productive year for you as well. Happy holidays everyone!